Jenkins and Docker – Part 1 of 3

This post is the first in a series of 3 introducing the combined power of Jenkins, Docker, and the Jenkins DSL.

They should hopefully provide enough information to get to grips with both Docker and Jenkins – what they both do and how to use them – by showing some practical examples of them working together.

The first step, if you haven’t already, is to download and install Docker on your platform – the Docker website covers this in good detail for most platforms…

Docker for Mac

Docker for Windows

Docker for Linux

Once that’s done, you can try it out with the customary “Hello World” example…

I’m running Docker on an Ubuntu VM, but the commands and the results are the same regardless of platform – that’s one of the main Docker concepts.

You can then check which processes (docker containers) are running using the “docker ps” command – in my example you can see that there’s one Jenkins image running. If you run “docker ps -a” you will see all containers (including stopped ones, of which I have a few on this host):

and you can check your Docker version with:

root@ubuntud:~# docker --version
Docker version 1.13.0, build 49bf474

Now that the basic setup is done, we can move on to something a little more interesting – downloading and running a “Dockerised” Jenkins container.

I’m going to use my own Dockerised Jenkins Image, and there will be more detail on that in the next post – you’re welcome to try it out too, just run this command in your terminal:

docker run -d -p 8080:8080 donaldsimpson/dockerjenkins

if you don’t happen to have my docker image cached locally (like I do) then docker will automatically download it for you from Docker Hub then run it:

That command did a quite few important things, here’s a quick explanation of them all:

docker run -d

tells docker that we want to run the container in the background so that we can carry on and do other things while it runs. The alternative is -it, for an interactive/foreground session.

docker run -d -p 8080:8080

The -p 8080:8080 tells docker to map port 8080 on the local host to port 8080 in the running container. This means that when we visit localhost:8080 the request will be passed through to the container.

docker run -d -p 8080:8080 donaldsimpson/dockerjenkins

and finally, we have the namespace and name of the Docker image we want to run – my “donaldsimpson/dockerjenkins” one – more on this later!

You can now visit port 8080 on your Docker host and see that Jenkins is up and running….

 

That’s Jenkins up and running and being happily served from the Docker container that was just pulled from Docker Hub – how easy was that?!

And the best thing is, it’s entirely and reliably repeatable, it’s guaranteed to work the same on all platforms that can run Docker, and you can quickly and easily update, delete, replace, change or share it with others! Ok, that’s more than one thing, but the point is that there’s a lot to like here 🙂

That’s it for this post – in the next one we will look in to the various elements that came together to make this work – the code and configuration files in my Git repo, the automated build process on Docker Hub that builds and updates the Docker Image, and how the two are related.

Extending Jenkins book

My new book, Extending Jenkins by Donald Simpson, has been published!

Here’s a free sample: Chapter 8 – Testing and Debugging Jenkins Plugins

You can buy the full book in either electronic or paperback format direct from the publishers or through Amazon here in the UK or Amazon in the US

About This Book

  • Find out how to interact with Jenkins from within Eclipse, NetBeans, and IntelliJ IDEA
  • Develop custom solutions that act upon Jenkins information in real time
  • A step-by-step, practical guide to help you learn about extension points in existing plugins and how to build your own plugin

Who This Book Is For

This book is aimed primarily at developers and administrators who are interested in taking their interaction and usage of Jenkins to the next level.

The book assumes you have a working knowledge of Jenkins and programming in general, and an interest in learning about the different approaches to customizing and extending Jenkins so it fits your requirements and your environment perfectly.

Table of Contents

1: Preparatory Steps
2: Automating the Jenkins UI
3: Jenkins and the IDE
4: The API and the CLI
5: Extension Points
6: Developing Your Own Jenkins Plugin
7: Extending Jenkins Plugins
8: Testing and Debugging Jenkins Plugins
9: Putting Things Together

What You Will Learn

  • Retrieve and act upon Jenkins information in real time
  • Find out how to interact with Jenkins through a variety of IDEs
  • Develop your own Form and Input validation and customization
  • Explore how Extension points work, and develop your own Jenkins plugin
  • See how to use the Jenkins API and command-line interface
  • Get to know how to remotely update your Jenkins configuration
  • Design and develop your own Information Radiator
  • Discover how Jenkins customization can help improve quality and reduce costs

In Detail

Jenkins CI is the leading open source continuous integration server. It is written in Java and has a wealth of plugins to support the building and testing of virtually any project. Jenkins supports multiple Software Configuration Management tools such as Git, Subversion, and Mercurial.

This book explores and explains the many extension points and customizations that Jenkins offers its users, and teaches you how to develop your own Jenkins extensions and plugins.

First, you will learn how to adapt Jenkins and leverage its abilities to empower DevOps, Continuous Integration, Continuous Deployment, and Agile projects. Next, you will find out how to reduce the cost of modern software development, increase the quality of deliveries, and thereby reduce the time to market. We will also teach you how to create your own custom plugins using Extension points.

Finally, we will show you how to combine everything you learned over the course of the book into one real-world scenario.

Beginning Docker video course

Blog updates have been scarce recently as I have been busy working on a couple of publications… the first of which has just been released:

This is a hands-on video course packed with practical examples to get you started with Docker.

Here is the course overview video:

 

And here is a free sample video from Section 2, “Docker Basics” where we take a look at running containers and the 3 different types of “containerized” commands:

 

and this final sample video is taken from Section 5 – “Running a Web Application with Docker“.

In this clip we build our own web application using Python, pip and Redis, which we will then “dockerize” and ship to “production”:

 

More detail from the Packt website:

About This Video

  • Master Docker commands by creating and publishing a sample web application
  • Build and manage your own custom Docker Containers to set up data sources, filesystems, and networking
  • Build your own personal Heroku PaaS with Dokku

Who This Video Is For

If you’re a developer who wants to learn about Docker, a powerful tool to manage your applications effectively on various platforms, this course is perfect for you! It assumes basic knowledge of Linux but supplies everything you need to know to get your own Docker environment up and running.

What You Will Learn

  • Build new Docker containers and find and manage existing ones
  • Use the Docker Index, and create your own private one by using containers
  • Discover ways to automate Docker, and harness the power of containers!
  • Build your own Docker powered mini-Heroku Paas with Dokku
  • Set up Docker on your environment based on your application’s custom requirements
  • Master Docker patterns and enhancements using the Ambassador and Minimal containers

In Detail

One of the major challenges while creating an application is adapting your application to run smoothly on all of the plethora of operating systems available. Docker is an extremely efficient technology that allows you to wrap all your code along with its supporting files into a single bundle; it also guarantees that your application will behave in the same way on any host powered by Docker. You can also easily reuse existing Docker containers or create and publish your own. Unlike Virtual Machines, Docker containers are lightweight and more efficient.

Beginning Docker starts with the fundamentals of Docker—explaining how it works, how to set it up, and how to get started on leveraging the benefits of this technology. The course goes on to cover more advanced features and shows you how to create and share your own Docker images.

You will learn how to install Docker on your own machine, then how to manage it effectively, and then progress to creating and publishing your very own application. You will then learn a bit more about Docker Containers; built-in features and commands such as volumes, mounts, ports, and linking and constraining containers; before diving into running a web application.

Docker has functionality such as the Docker web API to handle complex automation processes which will be explained in detail. You will also learn how to use the Docker Hub to fetch and share containers, before running through the creation of your own Docker powered mini-Heroku

Beginning Docker covers everything required to get you up and running with Docker, with detailed real-world examples and helpful tips to make sure you get the most from it.

Style and Approach

An easy-to-follow and structured video tutorial with practical examples of Docker to help you get to grips with each and every aspect.

The course will take you on a journey from the basics to the advanced application of Docker containers, and includes several real-world scenarios to learn from.

Cheers,

Don

 

Jenkins and Docker – Part One

This post lists the steps taken to get started with Docker – the basic install and getting a Docker container up and running on Ubuntu.

There’s nothing new or unusual in this section, but it forms the background of the next post(s) where I plan to go in to detail on different approaches to using Docker with Jenkins (and vice versa).

If you’re unfamiliar with Docker here is a good introduction:

and you can try Docker out easily on the docker site: https://www.docker.com/tryit/

 

 

In my case the Ubuntu is a pretty ordinary “ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS (GNU/Linux 3.13.0-35-generic x86_64)” running as a guest VM on my Development VM Ware ESXi Server.

Installing docker on Ubuntu is trivial – here are the commands I found via a quick google, there were no issues…

apt-get -y install docker.io

(FYI it’s called docker.io as there’s a previous/existing package with the name docker)

fix path issues:

ln -sf /usr/bin/docker.io /usr/local/bin/docker
sed -i '$acomplete -F _docker docker' /etc/bash_completion.d/docker.io

have docker start up at boot:

update-rc.d docker.io defaults

and that’s that done – all very simple, quick and straightforward, now it’s time to pull down an Ubuntu image…

docker pull ubuntu

once that’s done, you are ready to run a command (bash in the case of this quick test I found suggested elsewhere) in a docker container like so:

docker run -i -t ubuntu /bin/bash

(-i attaches stdin & stdout and -t allocates a terminal)

That’s it for this post – the next will look at dynamic Jenkins Slave provisioning using Docker Containers, Jenkins plugins for Docker and ways to use Docker for a variety of Jenkins build, deployment and test tasks for Continuous Integration, Continuous Build and DevOps purposes.

Cheers,

Don